recipes


"B"eautiful Berries

16 Sep 2011
Posted by karen
karen's picture

Berries are getting the bright lights for "B". I think they are positively wonderful. They are delicious and they are beautiful to behold. 

 

Nutrient note highlights - my top berry picks:

blueberries - phytonutrients, antioxidants (especially the wild ones)

cranberries - juice helps acidify urine to inhibit bacterial growth (recommended for bladder infections)

strawberries - high in vitamin C 

raspberries - folic acid, vitamin C, lutein

source of fibre

depending on the berry - varying amounts of magnesium, potassium, calcium, manganese

Berries on the Bushes

Some berries are still available free-for-the-picking - if you’re game to look for the wild ones. I have heard that in our area you can find patches of wild blueberries, cranberries and blackberries but their whereabouts are family secrets and well-protected. To date I've been privy to visit one good-sized wild blackberry patch.  A small bucket of berries was my reward in exchange for some nasty scratches and a blood donation to hungry mosquitoes. These details were forgotten by mid-January, however, when multi-berry smoothies satisfied cravings for summer.

Where I live in Nova Scotia we can pick cultivated blueberries from August until mid-October or later. Both my husband and I are diehard pickers: even if our fingers are numb we can't leave the patch until all our buckets are full. We will be stocking our freezer this fall with yet more ziploc bags of these blue nuggets of goodness.  But the berry season is definitely waning; though it happens annually, this is one food calendar page I hate to turn. 
 
Saying good-bye to this seasonal fruit and harvesting ritual is shared with the back to school routine.  Hello to the daily dilemma: what to pack for kids’ lunches. I marvel how my mother pulled this off for us five kids who scrambled out the door by 7:45, running to catch the yellow school bus.  Granted, over fifty years ago (yikes, it really was that long ago!) she had the perogative to fill those lunch boxes with whatever she had in her pantry and the time to prepare. She wasn't restricted by avoiding banned allergen foods - nuts, shellfish, some cheeses, to name a few- a reality for most lunch-packers with today's school policies.

But criteria for packed lunches still holds true for:  

tasty - or else the kids will trade that lunch you worked so hard to make

nutritious - to help young bodies and brain cells to concentrate and understand

has to survive the journey - traveling in a backpack and being thrown in a locker

has to be food-safe - so everyone stays healthy

Enter: the convenience of Frozen Berries

Your freezer might be stocked with berries you have picked this summer. If not, good-sized bags are available in most supermarkets, and they’ll cost less than buying fresh.

On a school (or work) morning, put a cup or less of good-sized frozen strawberries or blueberries in a small plastic container with a tight-fitting lid.  Remember to pack the spoon to go with it. By lunch time the berries will be thawed out with some very nice syrupy-juice that somehow tastes sweetn without adding sugar. (My grandkids think the juice is the best part.)The berries will be soft but should keep their shape; a very nice change from the standard lunch fruits - apples, oranges and bananas.

If your children like plain yogurt, put some frozen berries in with it - they'll act as mini ice paks, keeping the yogurt cool until lunchtime.

To add whole grain energy and some healthy fats, include a small baggie of homemade granola (or purchased equivalent) to either of the above suggestions.

 

Bake a Real Tasty Treat with Real Food Ingredients:  

 

Blueberry Apple Bread

2 cups peeled, chopped apples

1/2 cup honey

1/4 cup unsweetened apple sauce

2 Tbsp. olive oil

1 egg

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour

2 Tbsp. ground flax

1 1/2 tsp. baking powder

1/2 tsp. baking soda

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries

2/3 cups chopped walnuts (toasting them first adds to the flavour)

Preheat oven to 350 F.  Combine chopped apples, honey, applesauce and oil in a medium sized mixing bowl.  Add the egg and mix well. Combine 1 cup of the flour with the other dry ingredients in a separate bowl, then add to the apple mixture. Mix the remaining 1/2 cup flour with the berries (this helps stop frozen berries from 'bleeding' and to be more evenly suspended in the batter). Add to the batter, along with the walnuts.

Spread batter evenly into a lightly oiled and floured loaf pan. Put into oven - check after baking for 1 hour and 10 minutes. May need to bake about another 5-10 minutes, depending on your oven.  A tooth pick or sharp cake tester inserted into the centre of the bread should come out clean. 

Let cool before cutting.  Slices up nicely for packing in lunches if you can keep the family away from eating it all fresh out of the oven!

 

Bring out the berries - hope to meet you in the patch!

 

(Photo credits: Fimby

A is for Almonds

29 Aug 2011
Posted by karen
karen's picture

Welcome to the first post about the heart of the matter - the real food. This summer, three of my grandchildren (and their parents) have been living with us. My kitchen has been a production center for (mostly) all things healthy, including high energy treats which often use almonds. My opening act is going to showcase this personal favorite nut, which happens to start with the letter A, and is “a very good place to start.”

First, some FAQs - Almonds contain laetrile, giving this nut the claim to be considered cancer-preventing. Most of the fats in almonds are polyunsaturated and high in linoleic acid - the body's main EFA (essential fatty acid). They're high in calcium and vitamin E and contain some of the B vitamins. They contain good amounts of copper, iron, phosphorus, potassium - also zinc, magnesium, manganese and selenium are present in almonds.

So it's for good reason that raw almonds are one of my pantry staples - for adding to home-made granola, sprinkling on salads and cereal, tossing in a trail mix, and traveling companions for a quick pick-me-up. They’re readily available to buy, are tasty raw or toasted, and when it comes to the price of nuts they’re a good bang for your buck. Soaking almonds for a few hours makes them easier to digest.

Almond Milk Recipe

This is my recipe for making almond milk, which is quick, easy, and costs between 1/2 to 2/3 of the store-bought price. The real bonus? The list of ingredients is healthy and short: water, almonds.

Step #1 - Soak one cup of raw almonds in water overnight, ensuring they're well-covered.

Step #2 - In the morning, rinse well, draining the water. Put almonds into a blender along with 4 cups of fresh water. I have a Vitamix blender (one of my hardest-working kitchen tools and a brand I highly recommend), but a sturdy blender will do the trick. 

Step #3 - Blend water and almonds until totally blended. For my Vitamix, that's on high for 2-3 minutes straight; if using another brand I suggest stopping your machine every 30 seconds or so, continuing to start and stop for a few minutes until the water and almonds are thoroughly blended.

Step #4 - Strain the mixture through a cheesecloth, a fine strainer, or my first choice is a mesh bag like these Care Bags  (I get mine from ellora) -  they eliminate most of the mess that can be a deterrent to making almond milk. Gently squeeze and twist the bag, releasing the almond milk. Pour into a jar and refrigerate. Shake well before using, as some of the ground almond mixture will settle at the bottom.

This rich, creamy milk poured over cooked whole grain cereal, or with fresh fruit with raisins, or blended in a smoothie tastes like dessert! The almond meal that's left in the bag can be added to bread dough or muffin batter, composted, or offered as yummy morsels if you have happy chickens in your back yard.

Another go-to favorite in our house is almond butter. If you're hooked on it too you know it can be pricey, used sparingly as a treat.  Based on the best quality (non-organic) almond butter available where I shop, I've calculated that making my own almond butter cuts the price in half and it is fresh, fresh, fresh! It's not difficult, also is quick, but you must use a top quality food processor, like Cuisinart or Bosch, to be the work horse on this one.

Almond Butter Recipe

Step #1- Spread 3 cups raw almonds on a large cookie sheet and put into oven that's been preheated to 325 degrees F. Roast for 10 minutes and give the pan a shake. Put back in oven for another 10 minutes. Give pan another shake. Continue to roast for 3-4 minutes and check to make sure the almonds aren't getting too dark. Depending on your oven they shouldn't need much more than another 5 minutes. If they start to crack, they are darker than what I like. Remove from oven.

Step #2 - Move the almonds into the food processor bowl with the S blade in postition. There's no need to cool the almonds, in fact they release the oils better if they are still warm.

Step #3 - Process in short spurts, frequently scraping around the bowl. There'll be lots of starting, stopping and scraping but in about 10-12 minutes the almonds will be processed into a smooth enough consistency for yummy butter.

Step #4 - Be prepared to stand your ground in licking out the bowl.

A no-guilt snack - delicious dip for apple wedges, a spread for your favorite whole grain toast, scooping by the spoonful out of the jar. Refrigerate what's left. 

This is just the beginning of ideas for real food options. I look forward to you joining me on an interesting and inspiring journey, exploring our way through the joys of juices, the scoop on squash, and beyond to a 'zillion' ways of enjoying zucchini. 

(Photo credits FIMBY)

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